What is pollination for kids

All about pollutionparts of the pollinating flower
Explain pollination
self pollination and cross pollination
pollination vectors
Importance of pollinators
Threats to pollinators
How honey bees are adapted to pollen collection



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Introduction to Pollination.

Before we dig into this exciting lesson of pollination, be sure to check out the other lessons on asexual reproduction and sexual reproduction. This will give us a better picture of the lesson.

Living things live and die. In order for species to live on, new ones have to be produced. In plants, there are special structures that work to ensure that new plants are produced as older ones die. One way is that plants can reproduce by asexual means (no male and female required). The other way is by sexual means, where reproductive male and female cells of the plant interact to produce a viable seed.

This is where it gets interesting.

Flowers do not mate on their own. They do not move and see like other animals do, so to have any chance of male and female cell interaction, they need a little help from other living organisms such as bees, butterflies, and many insects and birds. In return for this help, plants give these helpers a treat, a very sweet liquid called nectar. These helpers are called pollinators. Nectar is simply sugar, produced inside the flower to attract these pollinators. This means that flowers that do not produce nectar are going to have to find a way to attract these helpers, or find other ways to reproduce.

Mutual relationship between flowers and pollinators

So, you can see that there is there is a special, mutual relationship between flowers and pollinators. Flowers give pollinators nectar, and pollinators help male flower cells meet female flower cells. The scientific term for this mutual relationship is symbiosis.

Did you know: Pollen researchers found that pollen contain protein (range from 2.5-61%). Pollen provides most of the dietary nitrogen for most bees and beetles. It also supplements the diets of consumers such as bats and birds.

Before we get into the details of this wonderful process of pollination, we have to understand the basic parts of a flower and the functions of its parts.

Next pollination page

Sources:
1. WHAT GOVERNS PROTEIN CONTENT OF POLLEN:
POLLINATOR PREFERENCES, POLLEN–PISTIL INTERACTIONS, OR PHYLOGENY? https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/30628/PDF (accessed on Aug 29th, 2018)